London For 5 Days With Stay In English Families Home

London for 5 Days with Stay in English Families Home

Experience operated by

Jorge and your team

We are a team of adventurers that will help you discover the best places in the world. We'll guide you throughout the adventures so you can live unique and life changing experiences.

We are a team of adventurers that will help you discover the best places in the world. We'll guide you throughout the adventures so you can live unique and life changing experiences.

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About experience

Itinerary

Day 1: Welcome to London | Half Day London City Tour

Stop At: Richmond-upon-Thames, Richmond-upon-Thames, Greater London, England
Welcome to London, a city with Royalty, educational institutions, sporting venues, drama, fashion and culture. Your five-day tour will be packed with fascinating and interesting visits. The agenda is as follows: After being met at one of the 5 airports in London, you will be transferred to your English host family community in Richmond. Richmond is one of the best suburbs in London with many facilities for the residents. Your English houses will be ready to show you the best way to immerse yourself in British culture while you stay. Check-in with the host families, and after a short break, you will obtain your daily travelcards. Now you are ready to explore the city.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Leicester Square, London England
Leicester Square is a square in London's West End. It was designed in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, named after Robert Sidney, the 2nd Earl of Leicester. Originally, the square was a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. In the late 18th century, when Leicester House was demolished and retail changes took place, it became a centre for entertainment. Today, Leicester Square is the heart of London with its restaurants, cafes, cinemas, casinos, fast food stores, hotels, international brands with the street performers and tourist crowds. No tour is completed in London without visiting Leicester Square. Leicester Square has been a popular venue for almost 400 years. Well, the vicinity welcomes more than 2.5 million visitors every week! It’s a meeting point of all Londoners and London lovers. The city's top shows and plays and over 52 star-studded red-carpet film premiers each year can widely be enjoyed by all visitors.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Piccadilly Circus, London W1J 9HS England
At the junction of Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue lies a trapezoidal area near London's West End known to the world as Piccadilly Circus. It's an odd name since there's no circus there, but even odder is that 'circus' usually denotes around city area where several streets meet in a circle, after the Roman plan. But that eccentricity fits Piccadilly Circus, since this area of the great British capital attracts the most diverse set of people in an already diverse town.
The first half of the Piccadilly Circus name comes from a 17th-century frilly collar called a “picadil”. The name is a perfect description, for here are the frills of London. Here are pubs, monuments, shops and nearby theatre in the West End. Piccadilly Circus, akin to New York's Times Square, it's filled with traffic, crowds and (at night) neon lights befitting its role as a major tourist attraction.
Known already by 1743 by its current name, the junction was created in 1819 and its history shows. There's the bronze Shaftesbury memorial fountain, erected in 1893, topped by a statue of Anteros, the Angel of Christian Charity. (The Evening Standard uses a graphic of the nude statue on its masthead.) Technologically innovative at the time, it was the first sculpture to be cast in aluminium. In the late 1980s, the fountain was moved from the centre to its present Piccadilly Circus location at the south-west corner of the intersection. Not far from the centre, is the off-centre (the literal translation of the Greek word 'eccentric') Reduced Shakespeare Company, who have performed at the Criterion Theater since 1995.
Their speciality is the rapid, highly improvised, presentation of the complete works of Shakespeare in 97 minutes. (Well, something that draws inspiration from 37 of the plays, anyway.) The 600-seat theatre regularly sells out, so plan ahead. The surrealistic show fits in well with the ambience of Piccadilly Circus, but for those interested in more traditional forms of theatre the London West End shows are only a few minutes’ walk. Here you can see the best of British theatre - shows which often are later imported to Broadway.
On the north-eastern side of Piccadilly Circus, is the London Pavilion. First erected in 1859 as a music hall, Shaftesbury Avenue bisected the site in 1885. A new building for the purpose was built and by 1923 was even lit with electric billboards. Rebuilt in 1986, the original 1885 facade was preserved, and the area converted to a shopping arcade. Later it was connected to the neighbouring Trocadero Centre. There are also pubs galore at Piccadilly Circus, but be selective. Some are nothing but tourists, some are very tourist unfriendly. While you're doing touristy things, don't miss the newly installed, giant, curved TV screen at Piccadilly Circus. Not even Times Square can compete with this one.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Carnaby Street, Soho, London W1F England
Welcome to the heart and soul of the fashion industry in the city. Carnaby Street is a pedestrian shopping street in Soho City and its colourful history stemmed from when the street was built in 1682, taking its name from Karnaby House to the first men's boutique, being the epicentre of the Swinging 60s, home to the punks of the 80s and up to today. It is an iconic London area. Between Oxford and Regent Streets, fashion and lifestyle retailers are just located here, including a large quantity of independent fashion shops. In the heart of London's shopping scene, Carnaby Street brings you over 100 foreign and British fashion brands, independent boutiques, one off concepts, trendy beauty emporiums, grooming salons and custom jewellery specialists together. From brand-new flagships and UK firsts to presenting one-off and unique designers, Carnaby's 14 streets are lined up with women's wear, men's clothing, cosmetics and accessories like no other. Not just for shopping of course, more than 60 independent restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs selling cheap à la carte and late-night drinks, even yummy breakfasts bedazzle the tourists and Londoners alike. Now it’s your turn to explore this lovely district with us.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Covent Garden, Covent Garden, London, England
Speaking of gardens, be sure not to overlook Covent Garden. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a very popular shopping and tourist site. Not really gardens at all, the area is a spectacular array of theatres, shops (many people visit London just for the shopping) and more where the street performers compete with restaurants, bars, clubs and shops for tourists' attention. Covent Garden is also the prime destination of theatregoers and patrons of the Royal Opera House by night. It’s situated right in the heart of London’s Broadway West End. The area wasn’t used to be a fancy part of the city, however, series of developments after 70’s made this district a prime destination for tourists. Indeed, Covent Garden is one of the vibrant places of interest in London. It plays a great role in today’s cultural life with its theatres, restaurants, cafes, street performers, stalls, markets and many attractions. It’s a must-see place in London.
Duration: 45 minutes

Stop At: Richmond-upon-Thames, Richmond-upon-Thames, Greater London, England
These are famous and glamorous areas of London which visitors always want to visit and explore. After this exploration, you will return to your homes where a yummy homemade English dinner waits for you. After dinner why don’t you visit one of our local pubs in the area where you can observe a real and traditional English pub.
Duration: 1 hour

Meals included:
• Dinner
Accommodation included: You will be staying in our English host family community in Richmond for the utmost and real British culture

Day 2: Full Day London City Tour - Sightseeing Bus Tour - London Eye - Buckingham Palace

Stop At: Green Park, Piccadilly, London W1J 9EJ England
After having a very nice English breakfast, you will start your day at Richmond Train Station. Here is today’s list of places of interest in London. Today you will explore the most important highlights of London with open deck sightseeing tour buses. Your journey starts in Green Park which is one of the Royal Parks of London. It connects with St James Park just across the road with Buckingham Palace in between. This nice park has an ornate fence with some paths that crisscross the park, and, in the summer, visitors can rent deck chairs to soak up the sun. Green Park is a good respite from the heavy London traffic as it is a lovely piece of greenery in the middle of the city of London and is a good place to take a stroll. The Park has a great connection to the London transportation system through a designated tube station as well as plenty of bus stations including sightseeing tour bus companies. The Ritz is one of the iconic hotels in London very close to the park. Other significant historical buildings close to Green Park are St James's Palace, Clarence House and Spencer House.
Duration: 15 minutes

Pass By: Hyde Park, London W2 2UH England
Hyde Park, perhaps most famous for the Speaker's Corner, where citizens stand atop a soapbox and shout their views to the crowd, but there's much more to see and do in Hyde Park than listen to political opinions. The land forming Hyde Park was first acquired by Henry VIII from the monks of Westminster Abbey in 1536. While Henry used Hyde Park for deer hunting, the horseback riding today is strictly not for sport. Casual and relaxing, the Hyde Park trails are abundant, but riders must bring their own horses. Visitors can often see the Royal Horse Artillery riding on horseback through Hyde Park early in the morning. Hyde Park was first made accessible to the public by King James I in the early 17th century, the park is split by the Serpentine, a river dammed to make an artificial lake. The idea was originated by the wife of King George II, an avid gardener. Boat rides on the Hyde Park lake remain a popular activity.

Pass By: Marble Arch, Park Lane, London W1H 7EJ England
Marble Arch used to be an entry gate of Buckingham Palace and today it’s the entry point of world’s famous shopping district of London, that’s Oxford Street as well as Hyde Park Speaker’s corner. Marble Arch also gave its name to the district where it was moved. This lovely masterpiece’s history is charming. Famous British architect John Nash (1752-1835) was also Prince Regent's (later known as King George IV) favourite architect. Under George's auspices, Nash designed and planned some important landmarks and masterpieces including Regent's Park, Regent Street, Carlton House Terrace, much of Buckingham Palace and lovely Marble Arch in London. By 1830 Nash's work with several statues and panels were completed in Buckingham Palace but suddenly King George IV died. Unfortunately, Nash was sacked by the Prime Minister of Wellington shortly after the King's death for the excessive expenditure of the project, so instead, architect Edward Blore had the task of completing the work economically and practically. When Blore found himself in possession of a jumbled collection of statues and panels, he was trying to obtain drawings by Nash to explain how his puzzle was meant to fit in but Nash was not happy about his dismissal. Despite its glory and triumph, this masterpiece contains a notable mistake. Our APTG blue badge guides will tell you the rest story during the tour.

Pass By: Oxford Street, London W1W 8LG England
Oxford Street is one of London’s artillery stretching between Tottenham Court Road and Marble Arch. It’s also Europe’s busiest shopping street hosting around half a million visitors daily. Today, there are more than 300 shops, cafes, restaurants, language schools, department stores and many more. It’s the heart of daily business, fun, leisure and of course shopping in London. Like everywhere in London, Oxford Street has its history. The street route used to be part of the Via Trinobantina, a Roman route that passes through London between Hampshire and Essex. It was known as the Tyburn Road during the Middle Ages when Tyburn Gallows was also known for its public hangings. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century and began to change from residential to commercial and retail use by the late 19th century, attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in the UK opened in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis & Partners and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch. Oxford Street, with several chain stores on the street and several buildings listed, remains in demand as a retail place amid the competition of other shopping malls, including Westfield Stratford City and the Brent Cross Shopping Centre. Because shopping is simply a tradition on this street and especially tourists love this experience during their stay in London.

Pass By: Regent Street, London W1, London England
Regent Street in London's West End is a major shopping street. It was laid out by architect John Nash and James Burton and named after George, Prince Regent later George IV, the uncle of Queen Victoria. George IV was a pleasure King. Therefore, you can see his grace and signature almost everywhere in London. We are talking about the King who also remodelled Windsor Castle. By the time you walk on the street, you will deeply learn the history of the British monarchs and their lifestyles in our charming city. Regent Street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Souls Church. The street is famous for its flagship international retail stores and brands, including Liberty, Hamleys, Jaeger, Apple Store, Microsoft, Bose, Burberrys, Anthropologie, Hugo Boss, Breitling, Calvin Klein, Coach, Desigual, Gant, Guess, H&M, Hollister, Kiko, Kipling, Lacoste, Longchamp, Levi’s, Mango, Michael Kors, Nike Town, The North Face, Omega, Polo Ralph Loren, Reiss, Superdry, Ted Baker, Tezenis, Tommy Hilfiger, Topman, Topshop, Tumi, Uniqlo, Yoshino, Zara and many more. Regent Street was one of London's first planned developments. After the Great Fire in London in 1666, Sir Christopher Wren and John Evelyn drew up plans for a reconstruction of the city according to the classical formal model. The ordinary configuration of London's roads replaced the mediaeval layout and houses were reconstructed on the old road network after a lack of development. The Royal Polytechnic Institution, now Westminster University, has been based on Regent Street since 1838.

Pass By: Piccadilly Circus, London W1J 9HS England
At the junction of Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue lies a trapezoidal area near London's West End known to the world as Piccadilly Circus. It's an odd name since there's no circus there, but even odder is that 'circus' usually denotes around city area where several streets meet in a circle, after the Roman plan. But that eccentricity fits Piccadilly Circus, since this area of the great British capital attracts the most diverse set of people in an already diverse town.
The first half of the Piccadilly Circus name comes from a 17th-century frilly collar called a “picadil”. The name is a perfect description, for here are the frills of London. Here are pubs, monuments, shops and nearby theatre in the West End. Piccadilly Circus, akin to New York's Times Square, it's filled with traffic, crowds and (at night) neon lights befitting its role as a major tourist attraction.
Known already by 1743 by its current name, the junction was created in 1819 and its history shows. There's the bronze Shaftesbury memorial fountain, erected in 1893, topped by a statue of Anteros, the Angel of Christian Charity. (The Evening Standard uses a graphic of the nude statue on its masthead.) Technologically innovative at the time, it was the first sculpture to be cast in aluminium. In the late 1980s, the fountain was moved from the centre to its present Piccadilly Circus location at the south-west corner of the intersection. Not far from the centre, is the off-centre (the literal translation of the Greek word 'eccentric') Reduced Shakespeare Company, who have performed at the Criterion Theater since 1995.
Their speciality is the rapid, highly improvised, presentation of the complete works of Shakespeare in 97 minutes. (Well, something that draws inspiration from 37 of the plays, anyway.) The 600-seat theatre regularly sells out, so plan ahead. The surrealistic show fits in well with the ambience of Piccadilly Circus, but for those interested in more traditional forms of theatre the London West End shows are only a few minutes’ walk. Here you can see the best of British theatre - shows which often are later imported to Broadway.
On the north-eastern side of Piccadilly Circus, is the London Pavilion. First erected in 1859 as a music hall, Shaftesbury Avenue bisected the site in 1885. A new building for the purpose was built and by 1923 was even lit with electric billboards. Rebuilt in 1986, the original 1885 facade was preserved, and the area converted to a shopping arcade. Later it was connected to the neighbouring Trocadero Centre. There are also pubs galore at Piccadilly Circus, but be selective. Some are nothing but tourists, some are very tourist unfriendly. While you're doing touristy things, don't miss the newly installed, giant, curved TV screen at Piccadilly Circus. Not even Times Square can compete with this one.

Pass By: Trafalgar Square, Centre of the City, London SW1A England
Trafalgar Square is a very touristic public square with some of London's most popular attractions, from galleries and historic buildings to monuments and statues, you can be a witness of deep-seated British history. Square also holds a series of events all year round. Listen to the stories of the kings such as Charles I, Charles IV, Admiral Horatio Nelson, General Sir Charles James Napier and Major General Sir Henry Havelock who shaped the history of this nation. Tourope UK's APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides will ready to take you an immaculate journey through the timeline of our nation.

Pass By: Horse Guards Parade at Whitehall, Horse Guards Whitehall, London SW1A 2AX England
Explore the official entrance to St James and Buckingham Palace, since the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660. Lifeguards have stood guard at Horse Guards and ready to offer you a true British ceremony. Although Changing The Queen's Lifeguard is not as well-known as Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace smaller crowds and no railings between you and the men and horses taking part make it ideal for those with younger children and those looking for some amazing pictures. The ceremony lasts about half an hour, and the mounted sentries change every hour, or half hour in very cold weather during the day until 16:00 when a dismounting ceremony takes place. The Queen's Lifeguard is normally provided by men of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment which consists of a Squadron of The Life Guards, who wear red tunics and white plumed helmets, and a Squadron of The Blues and Royals with blue tunics and red plumed helmets. Our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides will be ready to tell you amazing stories about this ceremony. A simply not to be missed attraction in the heart of the city.

Pass By: Downing Street, London SW1A 2AL England
Being one of the most important political buildings in the world, the United Kingdom's “White House”, Number 10 continuously hosts the British prime ministers since 1735. The main decisions affecting Britain's destiny in the last 275 years have seriously been taken behind its iconic black door. Today it's not possible to enter the street as a tourist but knowing the idea that an actual prime minister lives and works in the street is exhilarating.

Pass By: Westminster Abbey, 20 Dean's Yard Broad Sanctuary, London SW1P 3PA England
Westminster Abbey is a Church, burial ground, coronation site and much more and continues to attract visitors over 900 years after its founding. In many respects the architecture is common. There's the traditional cross-shaped floor plan with a nave, north and south transepts and several round side areas but both its execution and use raise The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster (the official name) to among the highest examples of church construction. Here at Westminster Abbey lie buried kings and poets, scientists and philosophers who have themselves raised humankind to the highest levels. Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell (discoverer of electromagnetic theory, which later leads to radio and TV), Chaucer and Kipling, Dr Samuel Johnson (creator of the first English dictionary) and many other justly famous names are interred here.

Pass By: Houses of Parliament, Parliament Square, London SW1A 0AA England
The Houses of Parliament, known also as the Palace of Westminster is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. They lie on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster, close by other government buildings in Whitehall. The oldest part of the building is still in existence, Westminster Hall, which dates from 1097. The palace originally served as a royal residence, but no monarch has lived in it since the 16th century. Most of the present Houses of Parliament structure dates from the 19th century when the Palace was rebuilt after it was almost entirely destroyed by a fire in 1834. The architects responsible for rebuilding the Palace was Sir Charles Barry and Augustus Welby Pugin, and the building is an example of the Gothic revival.

Pass By: Westminster Bridge, London England
Westminster Bridge is not an ordinary bridge to span the river Thames. It has a very tumultuous history in London. The bridge's colour is green and the story of the bridge is colourful. We will tell you about the history of the bridge after Lady Boudicca's role in London's 2000-year-old history. Oh before we leave we will walk along the bridge and take pictures of London Eye, Royal Festival Hall and the River Thames.

Stop At: London Eye, Westminster Bridge Road Riverside Building, County Hall, London SE1 7PB England
Our 32 capsule biggest Ferris Wheel dominates the skyline of London, and before the ride, sponsor's 4D presentation show will give you an insight into what to expect from the London Eye. Now that you get your inspiration, you are ready to fly. It will take exactly 30 minutes in the sky. Prepare your camera for the best possible shots as you will see many major landmarks of London from the London Eye.

Our Millennium Wheel is the first-built and largest observation wheel in the world (a type of evolution on the Ferris wheel) and has been since its opening at the end of 1999. The London Eye stands 135 metres (443 feet) high on the western end of Jubilee Gardens, on the South Bank of the River Thames in Lambeth, London, England, between Westminster and Hungerford Bridges. It is adjacent to London's County Hall and stands opposite the offices of the Ministry of Defence situated in Westminster which it overlooks to the west. The London Eye was designed by architects David Marks, Julia Barfield, Malcolm Cook, Mark Sparrow hawk, Steven Chilton, and Nic Bailey. The London Eye's wheel carries 32 sealed and air-conditioned passenger capsules attached to its external circumference. Rotating at a rate of 0.26 metres per second so that one revolution takes about 30 minutes to complete, the London Eye wheel does not usually stop to take on passengers (the rotation rate is so slow that passengers can easily walk) except for the wheelchair users. What a lovely panoramic sightseeing attraction in the city. Our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides will gladly tell you the history of the landmarks that you will see from the sky.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Pass By: Covent Garden, Covent Garden, London, England
Speaking of gardens, be sure not to overlook Covent Garden. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a very popular shopping and tourist site. Not really gardens at all, the area is a spectacular array of theatres, shops (many people visit London just for the shopping) and more where the street performers compete with restaurants, bars, clubs and shops for tourists' attention. Covent Garden is also the prime destination of theatregoers and patrons of the Royal Opera House by night. It’s situated right in the heart of London’s Broadway West End. The area wasn’t used to be a fancy part of the city, however, series of developments after 70’s made this district a prime destination for tourists. Indeed, Covent Garden is one of the vibrant places of interest in London. It plays a great role in today’s cultural life with its theatres, restaurants, cafes, street performers, stalls, markets and many attractions. It’s a must-see place in London.

Pass By: St. Paul's Cathedral, St Paul's Churchyard, London EC4M 8AD England
St Paul's Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from the 17th century and is generally reckoned to be London's fourth St Paul’s Cathedral, although the number is higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral. The first cathedral was built of wood by the Saxons. It burned down in AD 675 and was rebuilt, again in wood, ten years later. After this version was sacked by the Vikings in 962, the "second" St Paul’s was built, this time mainly in stone. The predecessor to Wren's cathedral, the third St Paul’s (known as Old St Paul’s), was begun by the Normans after the late Saxon cathedral suffered in a fire of 1087. Work took over two hundred years, and a great deal was lost in a fire in 1136. Nonetheless, the roof was once more built of wood, which was ultimately to doom the building. The church was "completed" in 1240 but a change of heart soon led to the commencement of an enlargement programme, which was not completed until 1314. The cathedral was however consecrated in 1300. It was the third-longest church in Europe at 596 feet (181 metres) and boasted one of Europe's tallest spires at some 489 feet (149 metres). England's first classical architect Sir Inigo Jones added the cathedral's new west front in the 1630s, but "Old St Paul’s" was finally ruined in the Great Fire of London of 1666. Building work on the latest St Paul’s Cathedral commenced in June 1675 to a design by a great English scientist and architect of the 17th century Christopher Wren, and St Paul’s Cathedral was completed on October 20 1708. The story starts from this point on and you can't wait to hear the rest of it from our qualified blue badge tourist guides.

Pass By: The Monument to the Great Fire of London, Monument St., London EC3R 8AH England
The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column situated near the northern end of London Bridge. Commemorating the Great Fire of London, it stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 feet (62 m) in height and 202 feet west of the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be destroyed by the Great Fire. The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farriner (or Farynor), the king's baker, where the blaze began. Hear the story of how London missed its opportunity to be a highly planned city of all times.

Pass By: London Bridge, London SE1 9DD England
London Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames, between the City of London and Southwark. It is between Cannon Street Railway Bridge and Tower Bridge; it also forms the western end of the Pool of London. The original London Bridge made this one of the most famous bridge emplacements in the world. It was the only bridge over the Thames in London until Westminster Bridge was opened in 1750. On the south side of London Bridge is Southwark Cathedral and London Bridge station. On the north side is the Monument to the Great Fire of London and Monument tube station.
A bridge has existed at or near the present site for nearly 2000 years. The first bridge across the Thames in the London area was built by the Romans on the present site around 46 CE and was made of wood. The location was most likely chosen as a bridgeable spot which still had deepwater access to the sea. The bridge fell into disrepair after the Romans left, but at some point either it was repaired or a new timber replacement constructed, probably more than once. In 1013, the bridge was burned down by King Ethelred in a bid to divide the invading forces of the Dane Svein Haraldsson.
This episode reputedly inspired the well-known nursery rhyme London Bridge is falling down. The rebuilt London Bridge was destroyed by a storm in 1091 and yet again, this time by fire, in 1136. The current London Bridge was constructed by contractors John Mowlem from 1967 to 1972 and opened by Queen Elizabeth II on March 17, 1973. London Bridge is a fairly dull edifice comprising three spans of pre-stressed concrete cantilevers, paid for in part by the sale of the earlier Rennie bridge. It is 928 feet (283 metres) long. The cost of £4m was met entirely by the City of London's Bridge House Estates. The current bridge was built in the same location as Rennie's bridge, which was carefully demolished piece by piece as the new bridge was built, so the bridge would remain in use throughout.
In 1984 the British warship HMS Jupiter collided with London Bridge causing significant damage to both ship and bridge. On Remembrance Day 2004, various London bridges were furnished with red lighting as part of a night-time flight along the river by wartime aircraft. The red lighting on London Bridge considerably improved its drab appearance, so it has been left on the bridge (but not the other bridges) and lights it at night.


Pass By: HMS Belfast, The Queen's Walk, London SE1 2JH England
HMS Belfast is the last remaining vessel of her type and one of the largest and most powerful light cruisers ever built. At 80 years old HMS Belfast is now a popular museum and tourist attraction in London. Built by Messrs Harland & Wolff in 1936, HMS Belfast was launched by Anne Chamberlain, wife of the then Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, on St Patrick's Day in 1938. This Warship was designed for the protection of trade and offensive action from Germany. Two months at sea and then, unfortunately, hit a magnetic mine and this masterpiece of Windsorian engineering was damaged so severely she was out of action for three years. On re-joining the home fleet in 1942 she was still the largest and most powerful cruiser in the Royal Navy and most importantly she was equipped with the most advanced radar systems. HMS Belfast was immediately called into action and played a crucial role in protecting the arctic convoys, Russia’s supply route throughout the war. Most notably in her role during the Battle of North Cape which saw the sinking of the German battle cruiser Scharnhorst and the loss of all but 36 of her 1,963 crew. HMS Belfast remained protecting the arctic convoys until 1944 when she spent five weeks supporting the D-Day landings and reportedly fired one of the first shots on D-Day itself. After the Second World War HMS Belfast played an active role in the Korean War from 1950-1952 working with other Allied Forces to support the retreating American and South Korean troops. HMS Belfast was brought to London opening to the public on Trafalgar Day, 21 October 1971. Her final years were spent performing peace-keeping duties until she was retired from service in 1963. Explore and visit this sleeping beauty by our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides today.

Pass By: Tower Bridge Road, London SE1 2UP England
Tower Bridge is probably city's most distinctive symbol for today. Bridge shows a lot to its medieval predecessor London Bridge with its starlings and elaborate twin towers that give the bridge its name but it's not just a homage to the past, hidden inside that medieval looking exterior there's a rather wonderful piece of Victorian engineering and in its day it was the biggest and most sophisticated lifting bridge in the world. Unlike London Bridge, the genius of the design is that the bridge can act as a gateway swinging open to allow tall ships to pass through. Plenty of things we will tell you about this masterpiece in London, just follow us!

Pass By: Tower of London, St Katharine's & Wapping, London EC3N 4AB England
Few prisons can claim to be as popular as the Tower of London, an attraction - unpleasant for some - for over 900 years. Its twenty towers are filled with an ancient tradition of royal blood, armor and jewels and the history to match. The Tower of London central structure began as a fort - used by the original builder William the Conqueror who completed the first tower around 1100 AD. At its completion it was the tallest building in London. Henry III had it whitewashed in the 13th century and the name, White Tower, has stuck. Later it evolved into a prison, used by Henry VII (and many others). Still later - and continuing to this day - it has acted as a repository for the extensive collection of crown jewels. Henry VII, nearly always short of money, had few jewels to store. But the stone complex, near the Tower Bridge alongside the River Thames, has also been used at various times to house the Royal Mint, the Public Records, the Royal Menagerie (later to form the starting point of the London Zoo) and an observatory (built in 1675). Listen to the rest of the story of the Tower of London from us today.

Stop At: Buckingham Palace, Spur Road, London SW1A 1AA England
Buckingham Palace is still actively used as both residence and offices, over 50,000 guests and invited diplomats to visit per year who interact with over 400 individuals for whom this is 'the office'. Nevertheless, several parts of Buckingham Palace are open to the public although we are here just for sightseeing today but you can listen to the story of Royal’s Residence that goes back to the 1820s.

Buckingham Palace is still the official residence of Britain's monarchy, as it has been since Queen Victoria's designation in 1837. Much of the Buckingham Palace was constructed as early as 1703 for the Duke of Buckingham. Buckingham House (as it was then known) was purchased in 1762 by George III, who used it as a private residence. Over the following 75 years the house was expanded to form three wings around a central courtyard. When Queen Victoria discovered Buckingham Palace lacked several 'necessary' rooms - such as a formal ballroom, a nursery, visitor's bedrooms and others - major additions were undertaken, including adding an entire wing to form a quadrangle. Buckingham Palace is the home of the Changing Guard Ceremony in London. The Changing of the Guard has been a tradition for hundreds of years whereby the Household Regiment, the Queen’s Guards at Buckingham Palace, change shift in a fascinating show of pomp and circumstance.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: St. James's Park, Horse Guards Road The Storeyard, London SW1A 2BJ England
You will then proceed to St. James’s Park which is a small central park of London when compared with New York’s Central Park. It’s not just a park as it has an interesting history which you will hear, and The Blue Bridge in the park offers you a great view of Buckingham Palace as well as government buildings and Horse Guards.

Imagine a park that is surrounded by world-famous landmarks such as Buckingham Palace, Clarence House and Whitehall right in the heart of the city. It is arguably the city's best park in every season. St James’s Park is one of London’s eight Royal Parks and covers an area of nearly 57 acres. Summer, fall, winter and spring, St James's Park gives you great joy with the outstanding beauty of its landscape with animals, nature and the vegetation you can admire. The park’s famous flower beds at the front of Buckingham Palace are a familiar backdrop to pageants including Trooping the Colour, as well as state visits and other ceremonial occasions. Can you believe this? Pelicans have lived in St James’s Park for nearly 400 years. They were originally presented as a gift from the Russian Ambassador to King Charles II. If we go back to 1500's, Tudor times we should mention our big King Henry VIII who was also known for his love of hunting; he regularly used Regent's Park as a hunting ground. St James's Park wasn't quite big enough for his needs, so he put it to use as an area for breeding young deer — once they were old enough, they were shipped off to Hyde Park and Regent's Park to face their fate. Listen to other stories from our tourist guides.
Duration: 45 minutes

Stop At: Horse Guards Parade at Whitehall, Horse Guards Whitehall, London SW1A 2AX England
You will see the Horse Guard inspection ceremony, which was a punishment ceremony 100 years ago but is now only ceremonial, at 4 pm and the history will be told to you by your knowledgeable guide.

Explore the official entrance to St James and Buckingham Palace, since the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660. Lifeguards have stood guard at Horse Guards and ready to offer you a true British ceremony. Although Changing The Queen's Lifeguard is not as well-known as Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace smaller crowds and no railings between you and the men and horses taking part make it ideal for those with younger children and those looking for some amazing pictures. The ceremony lasts about half an hour, and the mounted sentries change every hour, or half hour in very cold weather during the day until 16:00 when a dismounting ceremony takes place. The Queen's Lifeguard is normally provided by men of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment which consists of a Squadron of The Life Guards, who wear red tunics and white plumed helmets, and a Squadron of The Blues and Royals with blue tunics and red plumed helmets. Our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides will be ready to tell you amazing stories about this ceremony. A simply not to be missed attraction in the heart of the city. Next, you will go to Downing Street Number 10, the official residence of all British Prime Ministers where you can take photos of the iconic door, complete with the policeman.
Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: West End, London England
You can either return to your homes for dinner or turn this day to an amazing London culture experience with one of the West End musicals tonight. And please remember, this tour can be customized by considering the group’s interest. It’s totally up to you.
Duration: 2 hours

Meals included:
• Breakfast
• Dinner
Accommodation included: Your accommodation will be provided by our English host families in Richmond for tonight. What a lovely experience!

Day 3: Full Day London City Tour | Tower of London - Greenwich

Stop At: Embankment Pier, Victoria Embankment, London WC2N 6NU, London of Freedom#8573311~!#, UK
Your first journey for today would be to Greenwich by River Thames Cruise. Get on board, and the boat will glide through the Thames. Again, you will see many places of interest on the way to Greenwich. Most of the landmarks and places of interest you recognize from yesterday, but it would be the very first time for you to view from the River Thames. You will be able to take wonderful photos with no barriers.
Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: Tower of London, St Katharine's & Wapping, London EC3N 4AB England
You will disembark at this point because it’s time to visit the masterpiece Tower of London.

You will look up at the massive White Tower, wind your way through the Medieval King's Bedchamber and admire the world-renowned Crown Jewels. Meet the Yeoman Warders in a bloody story and stand where once known heads rolled! Enjoy the Kings Line of the White Tower with its fine arms from the collection of Royal Amour Gallery and extraordinary 17th- century carved wooden horses. It is a fascinatingly interesting journey that will engross you.

Few prisons can claim to be as popular as the Tower of London, an attraction - unpleasant for some - for over 900 years. Its twenty towers are filled with an ancient tradition of royal blood, armour and jewels and the history to match. The Tower of London central structure began as a fort - used by the original builder William the Conqueror who completed the first tower around 1100 AD. At its completion, it was the tallest building in London. Henry III had it whitewashed in the 13th century and the name, White Tower, has stuck. Later it evolved into a prison, used by Henry VII (and many others). Still later - and continuing to this day - it has acted as a repository for the extensive collection of crown jewels. Henry VII, nearly always short of money, had few jewels to store. But the stone complex, near the Tower Bridge alongside the River Thames, has also been used at various times to house the Royal Mint, the Public Records, the Royal Menagerie (later to form the starting point of the London Zoo) and an observatory (built-in 1675). Listen to the rest of the story of the Tower of London from us today.

Back to the pier, you will join another river cruise and will reach Greenwich along the River Thames.
Duration: 2 hours

Stop At: Cutty Sark, King William Walk Greenwich, London SE10 9HT England
Back to the pier, you will join another river cruise and will reach Greenwich along the River Thames. Upon arrival at Greenwich, you will start your exploration of the Cutty Sark. The Ferrari’s of the seas was how she was perceived at the time and our ancestors owe the joy of a good leaf tea to Cutty Sark, The British tea clipper and the last survivor.

This masterpiece of naval engineering, Cutty Sark, represents the pinnacle of clipper ship design and was one of the fastest ships of its day. Aged 14 years, Cutty Sark started recording remarkably fast passage times, under her Master Richard Woodget and became the dominant ship in bringing wool from Australia to England. Cutty Sark was built for China tea trade but would carry a vast array of cargoes during its career. Cutty Sark, the Ferrari of the seas carried almost 10 million pounds of tea between 1870 and 1877. The opening of the Suez Canal marked the end for sailing ships in the tea trade and so Cutty Sark had to find new employ. Delve into the fascinating history of Cutty Sark, now an award-winning visitor attraction in Greenwich with our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides. We celebrated Cutty Sark's 150th anniversary in 2019.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Royal Observatory Greenwich, Blackheath Avenue, London SE10 8EJ England
You will then walk along to the Royal Observatory in the centre straight up to Greenwich Park. The Prime Meridian of the World and the only Planetarium in London is home to this. As you will see the East and The West hemisphere divides here. Place both your legs in both Hemispheres and voila! Ready to admire the beautiful landscape of London?. Get your camera ready as you will like the view of London from this point.

Welcome to Space and time’s place in the world, The Royal Observatory of Greenwich, where the Greenwich Meridian Line is located. Take a selfie on the Meridian Line with a foot to the West Hemisphere and a foot to the East Hemisphere. Discover one of London's most cherished views through Greenwich Royal Park and the Thames River. Learn the findings of leading scientists and inventors based or associated with the Royal Observatory from your guide today.

Greenwich Mean Time was at one time based on the time observations made at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, before being superseded by Coordinated Universal Time. Whether it's observing the stars, standing astride the Prime Meridian or marvelling at John Harrison's timepieces, the Royal Observatory Greenwich provides a treasure trove of fascinating information. Marvel at the history of space, time and navigation, stand on the world-famous Meridian Line with one foot in the west and one foot in the east at the Royal Observatory. Enjoy one of the most-loved views of London at the home of Greenwich Mean Time. Hear about the story of Docklands and explore how great scientists first mapped the seas and the stars in Charles II's magnificent Christopher Wren-designed Octagon Room - dating from 1675. Marvel at the Great Equatorial Telescope, the UK's largest historic telescope which gave astronomers new views of the universe over 100 years ago. While Greenwich no longer hosts a working astronomical observatory, a ball still drops daily to mark the exact moment of 1 p.m. (13:00), and there is a good museum of astronomical and navigational tools.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Queen's House, Romney Road Greenwich, London SE10 9NF England
Queens House is the former residence of the consort of King James I/VI, Anne of Denmark, the mother of Charles I who lost his head during the Civil War. The Stuarts are such an important dynasty in British history. Our APTG qualified guides will share all important information about the kings and queens of England here in this house. Therefore, Queens House is one of the most important buildings in British architectural history. We can clearly see the trace of Italian architecture touches in this building and the reason for this is because the architect Inigo Jones built this masterpiece a year after his return from the grand tour in Italy in 1614. Construction of the house began in 1616 but work on the house stopped in April 1618 when Anne the consort of James I/VI became ill and died the next year. Work restarted this time when the house was given to the queen consort Henrietta Maria in 1629 by King Charles I, and the house was structurally complete by 1635 finally. The Queen’s House is considered remarkable for its break with the traditional, red-brick Tudor style of building, and its elegant proportions and the high quality of its interiors. Queen Henrietta Maria turned the building into her personal ‘house of delight’, filling the rooms with the most cutting-edge art and design of the day. Henrietta Maria’s white and gold colours, fleur-de-lis symbol and initials are present everywhere in the house’s original features. Therefore, we can see some significant connections between this house and Windsor Castle. The Tulip Stairs and lantern are the most iconic photo spots being the very first centrally unsupported helical stairs constructed in England. The stairs are supported by a cantilever from the walls with each tread resting on the one below. Queens House was only used for 7 years until the Civil War began in 1642 which meant that Henrietta Maria had little time to enjoy it – she went into exile, her husband was executed and his property seized by the state. Following the restoration, in 1660 Henrietta Maria returned to England. She lived at the Queen’s House from 1662 and was the last queen to do so. During the restoration period, Charles II, who began a new palace in 1664 (design by Denham and Webb, now incorporated as part of the Old Royal Naval College), redesigned and replanted the Park, and in 1675-76 founded and built the Royal Observatory (designed by Sir Christopher Wren). The Royal Observatory is Britain's oldest purpose-built scientific structure in London. James II, (as Duke of York and Lord Admiral to 1673) was often at Greenwich with his brother Charles. According to Samuel Pepys, it was James who proposed the idea of creating a Royal Naval Hospital. This was then established at Greenwich by his daughter, Mary II who commissioned Wren to design the Royal Hospital for Seamen, now the Old Royal Naval College, in 1692-3. The work began in 1696 under her widower husband William III, who supported it in her memory. Queen Mary insisted that the view from the Queen's House to the River Thames should be left clean and not blocked by the new buildings. This view continues to the present day. The sister of Mary II, Queen Anne and Prince George of Denmark continued to patronise the project (of which George was Grand Committee chairman from the 1690s to his death in 1708). In 1714 the Georgian era started with George I, who landed at Greenwich from Hanover on his accession. In 1735 George II granted the Hospital the forfeited Jacobite Earl of Derwent water’s estates (c. 80,000 acres mainly in Northumberland). This allowed completion of the Hospital by 1751. In 1805-06 George III, the grandfather of our Queen Victoria granted the Queen's House to the Royal Naval Asylum, an orphanage school under Royal patronage. In 1821-25 this amalgamated with the pre-existing Greenwich Hospital School. It was extended with the buildings which are now the National Maritime Museum and was renamed the Royal Hospital School by Queen Victoria in 1892. Queen Victoria’s uncle George IV donated nearly 40 paintings, including JMW Turner's only royal commission in 1824. This created the Naval Gallery of Greenwich Hospital in the Painted Hall, Britain's first public national historical art collection. We all know that George IV is a pleasure and art king of our nation. These now form the Greenwich Hospital Collection in the National Maritime Museum. William IV the son of George III and the uncle of Queen Victoria, our 'Sailor King' made further donations to the Gallery. Queen Adelaide continued to be a regular and popular visitor in his memory. Queen Victoria only occasionally visited Greenwich. When Nelson's Trafalgar coat appeared on the market in 1845 Prince Albert bought it for the Naval Gallery. He paid £150 for it. George V and Queen Mary both privately supported creation of the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. Queen Mary presented many items to it, both from her own Nelson collection, and other royal items. George VI the father of our Queen Elizabeth II, laid the foundation stone of the new Royal Hospital School at Holbrook, Suffolk. As Duke of York, in 1937, as his first major public act as King, just three weeks before his Coronation - George VI opened the National Maritime Museum. In 1948, whilst still princess, Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh made their first joint visit to Greenwich. This was also the year that the Duke of Edinburgh became a trustee of the National Maritime Museum. Both have opened or visited countless projects at Royal Museums Greenwich, including the opening of the Cutty Sark in 1957.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: 5B Greenwich Market A206, London SE10 9HZ England
In Greenwich Market, you will find plenty of art & craft stalls, antiques, all kinds of fashion goods, market food, jewellery, retro shops, irresistible delis, bakeries and cakes, pubs, bars, restaurants, crafts stuff and many more. You will fall in love with the area.

Since the middle ages, all stalls have constantly been trading in the historic district of Greenwich where you can find a wide range of goods including street foods, books, vinyl, CD’s, DVD’s, vintage clothes, beads, crocheted and knitted items, jewellery, antiquity, fruits, vegetables, olives, freshly prepared products such as bread, cakes, cookies, scones, healthy foods, meat products, fish and dairy products, any type of second-hand goods including bikes, garden plans, flowers, electronic gadgets, mobile phone accessories, typical English art and craft stands, hand made things, yarns, embellishments, totes, bags, suitcases, simply beyond your imagination. The Greenwich Market also offers to flourish local street food, arts and crafts market on scheduled days selling organic produce from local farmers and work from some of the region's most talented artists, craftsmen, potters, sculptors and photographers. To feel the soul of this vibrant district, historic Greenwich Market would the best hit in this historic naval town. For art & craft lovers, do visit market on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and weekends; for antique and collectable buffs don't forget to pop in on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. You will love this lovely market we bet.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Palace of Placentia, Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich SE10 9NN, UK
A description of the Palace of Placentia in one sentence would be “The Buckingham Palace of the Tudors”. This lovely English Royal Palace, built by Humphrey, the Duke of Gloucester, in 1443, was sadly demolished by Charles II in 1660 during the restoration period in order to construct the new palace which was never constructed till 40 years later. Instead, today's Royal Naval College was built in the foundation of the site. Palace of Placentia has a very deep background in English history. Humphrey, The Duke of Gloucester was the regent of Henry VI. He built this palace under the name of Bella Court but later on, things changed and Humphrey lost his life in prison. It was popularly believed that he was murdered by Henry VI. This is depicted in William Shakespeare’s plays in the Globe Theatre too. Margaret Anjou, the consort of Henry VI took over Bella Court and renamed as Palace of Placentia. Henry VI’s nephew Henry VII, the very first Tudor, who is also the father of our infamous King Henry VIII rebuilt this palace between 1498 and 1504. This is where Henry VIII was born in 1491 and the palace remained the principal royal palace for the next two centuries. Therefore, we may call this palace the Buckingham Palace of the Tudors if you like. Henry VIII’s very first child Mary Tudor was born in this palace in 1516 (Our Bloody Mary and we will tell you the story) from his first marriage with Catherine of Aragon. From his second marriage with Anne Boleyn, our Virgin Queen Elizabeth I was born in Palace of Placentia in 1533. After the loss of his third wife Jane Seymour who was the most popular amongst his 6 wives, he married with wife number four Anne of Cleves in this palace but we all know that marriage was a total disaster due to the blind date. Although they hated each other both Queens lived in the Palace of Placentia. During the reign of James I/VI and his son Charles I, the Queens House was erected to the south area of the complex. Our APTG guides have many stories ready to share with you today.
Duration: 30 minutes

Pass By: Greenwich Foot Tunnel, Cutty Sark Gardens Greenwich, London SE10 9HT England
Greenwich Tunnel is one of the marvels of the late Victorian period in England. The project began in June 1899 and the tunnel opened on August 4, 1902. The tunnel actually replaced an expensive and often unreliable ferry service enabling staff living south of the Thames to access their workplaces in the London docks and shipyards in or around Isle of Dogs. It’s the only pedestrian tunnel beneath the River Thames that allows walkers and cyclists. The tunnel was restored after destruction during World War II. The entrance shafts at both ends are under glazed domes. Built-in 1904, lifts were upgraded in 1992 and again in 2012, and helical staircases allow pedestrians to enter this sloping, tiled tunnel. This cast-iron tunnel is 1,215 feet (370.2 m) wide, 50 feet (15.2 m) deep and about 9 feet (2.74 m) in diameter. The cast-iron rings are coated with some 200,000 white glazed tiles. Bombs weakened the northern end during World War II, and repairs required thick steel and concrete inner lining that significantly reduces diameter for a short span. The North Tower has 87 steps, the South Tower has 100 steps. Greenwich Foot Tunnel is actually one of the best examples to understand London’s subway system because cast iron tunnelling is the main principle of building the tunnels in the late Victorian eras.

Stop At: Richmond-upon-Thames, Richmond-upon-Thames, Greater London, England
Tonight, you can either embellish your program by adding one of the famous West End Musicals in Covent Garden (Please see our available West End musical packages), or we can proceed with our English homes in Richmond for dinner. Rest of the night you can enjoy a traditional English Pub in Richmond.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Meals included:
• Breakfast
• Dinner
Accommodation included: You will be staying in our English host family community in Richmond for the utmost and real British culture experience.

Day 4: Full Day London City Tour - The British Museum - Shakespeare's Globe Theatre - Tate Modern - The Shard

Stop At: The British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG England
Today’s tour will begin with the British Museum, the biggest and most important museum of human history and culture. The British Museum was founded in 1753 and is one of the oldest museums in the world. The British Museum has been mainly based on Sir Hans Sloane 's collections. There are 40,000 books, seven thousand manuscripts, extensive samples of natural history, Albrecht Dürer prints and antique works from Rome, Greece, Egypt, the Middle East and the Far East, the Americas. It will be a three-hour tour.

The British Museum is one of the oldest museums in the world that was established in 1753. The British Museum was based largely on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. We are talking about 40,000 printed books, 7,000 manuscripts, extensive natural history specimens, prints by Albrecht Dürer and antiquities from Rome, Greece, Egypt, the Middle and the Far East and the Americas. Our 3 hours will be dedicated to this museum for today.

After the British Museum, our destination will be St. Paul’s Cathedral.
Duration: 3 hours

Stop At: St. Paul's Cathedral, St Paul's Churchyard, London EC4M 8AD England
Next on the agenda is Sir Christopher Wren’s masterpiece, St Paul's Cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from the 17th century and is generally reckoned to be London's fourth St Paul’s Cathedral, although the number is higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral. You will learn all about the interesting history of London’s iconic church.

St Paul's Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from the 17th century and is generally reckoned to be London's fourth St Pauls Cathedral, although the number is higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral. The first cathedral was built by the Saxons in wood. It burned down in AD 675 and was rebuilt, again in wood, ten years later. After this version was sacked by the Vikings in 962, the "second" St Pauls was built, this time mainly in stone. The predecessor to Wren's cathedral, The third St Pauls (known as Old St Pauls), was begun by the Normans after the late Saxon cathedral suffered in a fire of 1087. Work took over two hundred years, and a great deal was lost in a fire in 1136. Nonetheless, the roof was once more built of wood, which was ultimately to doom the building. The church was "completed" in 1240 but a change of heart soon led to the commencement of an enlargement programme, which was not completed until 1314. The cathedral was however consecrated in 1300. It was the third-longest church in Europe at 596 feet (181 metres) and boasted one of Europe's tallest spires at some 489 feet (149 metres). England's first classical architect Sir Inigo Jones added the cathedral's new west front in the 1630s, but "Old St Pauls" was finally ruined in the Great Fire of London of 1666. Building work on the latest St Pauls Cathedral commenced in June 1675 to a design by a great English scientist and architect of the 17th century Christopher Wren, and St Pauls Cathedral was completed on October 20 1708. The story starts from this point on and you can't wait to hear the rest of it from our qualified blue badge tourist guides.
Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Tate Modern, 53 Bankside, London SE1 9TG England
Your next stop is either Tate Modern or Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. The choice is yours as both landmarks in the same proximity. The best way from St. Paul’s Cathedral to Tate Modern or Shakespeare Globe is passing by the famous Millennium Bridge with the beautiful view of Thames and London’s bumpy skyline. If you are an art lover, you will realize why Tate Modern is not only in London but also throughout the U.K.’s top attraction.

Without a trip to Tate Modern, a visit to London surely is not complete. Tate Modern is a National Gallery for International Modern Art featuring masterpieces by Henri Matisse, Salvador Dalí, Magritte, Mirò, Louise Bourgeois, Yayoi Kusama, Cornelia Parke, Mark Rothko and many more. Built in 2000 from a disused power plant and extended in 2016 with a newer Blavatnik building, Tate Modern is Britain's national museum of modern and contemporary art from around the globe, and the world’s most visited contemporary art gallery. Housed in the former Bankside Power Station on the banks of the Thames, the awe-inspiring Turbine Hall is the dramatic setting for new art commissions. The collection is free to visit and the most important, our APTG Blue Badge art professional guides promise a unique way for our guests to find out more about the art on display in this greatest works of art shrine.
Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, 21 New Globe Walk, London SE1 9DT England
If you are a William Shakespeare fan, Globe Theatre is a shrine for you and for your groups.

William Shakespeare is arguably the most famous British writer of all time, he wrote about life, love, death, revenge, grief, jealousy, murder, magic and mystery. His plays were the blockbuster entertainment of his day - some of his most famous are Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and Hamlet. You will understand how Shakespeare’s plays had a changing impact on the world by visiting the reconstructed Elizabethan theatre where there will be live commentary of the productions in Elizabethan times showing the power of performance, cultivating intellectual curiosity and excites learning to make Shakespeare accessible for all — the Shakespeare’s Globe Tour can give you an opportunity to learn more about this unique building and its most famous playwright, Shakespeare. Hidden under the Globe Theatre, the fascinating Exhibition delves into the life of Shakespeare, how London was at the time he lived there, and the theatre for which he wrote. You will be able to imagine the Globe as it would have been, nestled in the notorious entertainment district, surrounded by raucous taverns and bawdyhouses. Just let our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides take you there.
Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: The Shard 32 London Bridge Street, London SE1 9SG England
Today is the last day in London for everyone before you travel home tomorrow. You will go to London’s roof, The Shard for an immaculate London by night experience. This extraordinarily designed 95 story London’s skyscraper is designed by an Italian architect Renzo Piano. It’s a new building and lovely to explore at night.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Stop At: Richmond-upon-Thames, Richmond-upon-Thames, Greater London, England
After The Shard, you will return to your homes. Since we will be out today, dinner will not be served for tonight. Instead, you may enjoy vast international food choices that London offers almost in every corner.
Duration: 1 hour

Meals included:
• Breakfast
Accommodation included: You will be staying in our English host family community in Richmond for the utmost and real British culture experience.

Day 5: Half Day London City Tour | Transferring to the Airport

Stop At: Madame Tussauds London, Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR England
Before you say goodbye to London, you will explore the rest of our city. In the morning you will visit London’s iconic wax museum Madame Tussaud’s. The Wax Museum displays a large collection of famous figures from world history along with the latest Hollywood celebrities, world politicians, movie characters, as well as sport and music superstars. The collection traces its origins to Madame Tussaud's inheritance of her tutor Dr Curtius' collection. In 1802, she moved from Paris to London, and the museum started in 1835. Since then many things have changed, and now Tussauds Group dominates an entertainment emperor worldwide. If you still haven’t been in this museum before, this is a true must-do activity in the world’s capital for today.

Madame Tussaud learnt her extraordinary skill of wax modelling by creating death masks of the guillotine victims in France from the 18th and 19th centuries. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were among her ' clients.' In the modern museum, this blend of accurate and macabre art can be seen but with a much stronger sense of fun!. Therefore, the museum is one of the most popular tourist attractions not just in London, but in almost every large city of the world. Madame Tussaud’s attracts more than two million visits every year. From the Hulk to Brad Pitt, from Jack the Ripper to Princess Diana or Winston Churchill, everyone wants to take a photo with them. Just search and find your favourite film, sport, music star or politician in the museum. Don’t miss the Marvel’s London Adventure 4D IMAX movie experience (Wear your 3D glasses and sit upright & go) and also the Star Wars gallery. The characters you love including 3PO and R2 will be just next to you. You will spend approximately 90 to 100 minutes in the museum.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Stop At: Oxford Street, London W1W 8LG England
According to your flight schedule, you can extend your London visit to Oxford Street for a wonderful last shopping experience in the heart of the city.

Oxford Street is one of London’s stretching between Tottenham Court Road and Marble Arch. It’s also Oxford Street is one of London’s artery stretching between Tottenham Court Road and Marble Arch. It’s also Europe’s busiest shopping street hosting around half a million visitors daily. Today, there are more than 300 shops, cafes, restaurants, language schools, department stores and many more. It’s the heart of daily business, fun, leisure and of course shopping in London. Like everywhere in London, Oxford Street has its history. The street route used to be part of the Via Trinobantina, a Roman route that passes through London between Hampshire and Essex. It was known as the Tyburn Road during the Middle Ages when Tyburn Gallows was also known for its public hangings. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century and began to change from residential to commercial and retail use by the late 19th century, attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in the UK opened in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis & Partners and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch. Oxford Street, with several chain stores on the street and a number of buildings listed, remains in demand as a retail place amid the competition of other shopping malls, including Westfield Stratford City and the Brent Cross Shopping Centre. Because shopping is simply a tradition on this street and especially tourists love this experience during their stay in London.
Duration: 2 hours

Stop At: Heathrow Terminal 5, Longford, Hounslow TW6 2GA, UK
Time to take your party and the group back to the airport for your flight and transfer you to one of the airports in the city. Hope to see you next time in London as there are plenty of things that you can discover in the capital of the world.
Duration: 1 hour

Meals included:
• Breakfast
No accommodation included on this day.

$2,917.11 Per Person

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$  
2,917
.11 USD
Per Person